Spotlight
on
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The one
who
introduced
bean
bags
to the
library
l3nrul*.
L,lCALi-i5Iiir.'-t love
of
books
started from
an early
age.
One of
the
school
librarian's
ear-
liest memories
is
of her mother
reading
Poddington
Beor
lo
her.
Mrs McAllister
is
from
Coleraine,
Northern lreland
and
she
read
English
Literature
at
Trinity
College,
Dublin.
After
studying
journalism at
City
University, London,
she
worked in market-
ing and
editorial at
Penguin
Books
for ten
years.
She
came
to
work at
Latymer
in
2003,
first
as
library
assistant,
then
as
school
librarian.
She
organises book clubs
and
diverse events
to
mark
occasions
such
as
World
Book
Day.
Last
year she ran
a
'Bookface' quiz,
where students
had
to
guess
the 'mystery
readers'.
She also
invites authors
to visit
so
that we
have
the
opportunity
to
meet
and chat
with
pub-
lished
writers.
"Some
of
my
favourite
memories come
from the
book clubs and
talking to the
stu-
dents
about literature,"
says
Mrs
McAllister.
"Series
hke
Harry
Potter
are
popular, although
I
hope
that
people
browse
to
find
more adventurous
reading
choices.
I
believe
'there
is
a
book
for
every
reader', whether
it
be an ebook
or
a
tradi-
tional
book.
lt
is
the feeling of immersing
yourself
in
what you are
reading
that
mat-
ters
to
me. Provided books are
constantly
evolving and relevant
to
each
generation,
I
think
that
all
means
of
reading
them
are
good."
Last
summer
the War Memorial
and
Ashworth Memorial
Library was given
a
facelift,
with
a
fresh
lick
of paint,
new
car-
pet, new lighting,
polished tables
and
non-
squeaky chairs
to
make
it
one of
the
most
comfortable
areas
of the
school. Mrs
McAllister
recommends
it
as
a
great
place
to
read and
study
in a peaceful ambience.
"The Latymer School
has a
strong
sense
of history
and
tradition. l'm
classically
trained in
books and
librarianship, but
you
need
to
reinvent
past glories
for
each gen-
eration.
I
like
to juxtapose
new
forms with
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the traditional
ones.
I
enjoy
working with
Latymer students and
staff, and
I
hope
that the library
supports
them
and reflects
many aspects
of our
school
life,"
says
Mrs
McAllister.
"Though
whatever
I
achieve
as
librarian,
l'll
be
remembered
as
the
one
who introduced
bean
bags
to
the libraryl"
When
our librarian isn't promoting
books
to the
school
community,
she
likes
to
practise yoga,
paint
and enjoy
the
countryside.
"l
really am keen on
quiet
and
medita-
tion,"
she
says,
and
it
comes
across
in her
calm and
friendly
personality.
She also
jokes
that
she
"conforms to the
cat-mad
librarian stereotype"
because
of
her
two
tortoiseshell
cats.
On a
more
serious note,
in 2005 she co-founded
the
local branch
of
the
National
Autistic
Society
to
cam-
paign
for
better educational provision.
Her
younger daughter
Bonnie
is
autistic
and
attends
a local complex needs school.
Her
elder daughter
Kerry
attended
Latymer
and
is
now
studying at
Aberystwyth
University.
So
whether it
was
a
fleeting moment
as
you borrowed
a
book,
or
a
friendly
chat
in
the corridor, l'm
sure
you've all met
Mrs
McAllister
at some
point and l'm
sure
you've
all smiled
whilst
doing so.
l'd
like
to
say
a
big
thank
you
for
all her
hard
work
in
the
library
and
I
look
forward
to
all
the
book
discussions
to
come.
Hannah
Taylor 72
HUG
D!*
Y{,:* know
that within
living memory
Latymer was
a
fee
paying grammar
school? Between 1910 and
1944
tuition
fees
provided about
35%
of
the
school
income. The rest came
from
Middlesex
County Council and
the
Board
of
Ed
ucation.
The Foundation
only
provided about
6
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6
3%
of
the
school's income.
ln
1937
fees
for
residents of
the
Borough
of
Edmonton
were
seven
guineas
a
term
and
for those outside of
Edmonton eight
guineas.
About
60%
of
Latymer pupils received
some
form
of
financial
assistance,
either
a
full
fees scholarship
from
Middlesex or
partial
assistance
with
fees
from
the
Latymer Foundation.
With
the
passing
of
the
1944 Butler
Education Act all
state
grammar
schools
became
free for
those
who could
pass
the
eleven
11 plus.
Andrew
Granath
1,2,3,4,5 7,8